Egyptian lecture in Mythology

At the Egyptian residence in Stockholm, Sweden Mrs. Reem Maguid Amin invited IWC (the International Woman club) and the Diplomatic spouses club of Stockholm for an online lecture on Zoom. A few invited guests Mrs Victoria Plakhotniuk spouse of Ukrainian Ambassdor, and Mrs Julia Kleiousi spouse of United Kingdom Ambassdor, and Mrs. Lucy Chuang together with Cawa Media were able to visit this afternoon presentation on the 24th of February 2021.

The lecture were about the Eye of Horus, also known as wadjetwedjat or udjat, is an ancient Egyptian symbol of protection, royal power, and good health. The Eye of Horus is similar to the Eye of Ra, which belongs to a different god, Ra, but represents many of the same concepts.

Funerary amulets were often made in the shape of the Eye of Horus. The symbol ”was intended to protect the pharaoh [here] in the afterlife” and to ward off evil. Ancient Egyptian and Middle-Eastern sailors would frequently paint the symbol on the bows of their vessels to ensure safe sea travel.

Horus

Horus was the ancient Egyptian sky god who was usually depicted as a falcon, most likely a lanner or peregrine falcon. His right eye was associated with the sun god, Ra. The eye symbol represents the marking around the eye of the falcon, including the ”teardrop” marking sometimes found below the eye. The mirror image, or left eye, sometimes represented the moon and the god Djehuti (Thoth).

It was believed by the Greeks and Romans that an evil heart could get to the eye. The thought to be powerful effects of eyes and optics created the myth that the energy-producing power of the eye had the ability to cast evil spells with just a glance. Because the ancients believed the evil eye could be counteracted with a ‘good eye’, myths about Horus arose.

In one myth, when Set and Horus were fighting for the throne after Osiris‘s death, Set gouged out Horus’s left eye. The majority of the eye was restored by either Hathor or Thoth. When Horus’s eye was recovered, he offered it to his father, Osiris, in hopes of restoring his life. Hence, the eye of Horus was often used to symbolise sacrifice, healing, restoration, and protection.

 

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